Tom Petty Died & I Can’t Stop Crying

I waited. I knew I needed to go to bed. As dusk faded into night, my living room lamp turned itself off at the scheduled time. Still, I sat. I had to hold vigil for Tom and this was the only way I could do it: waiting for the official news that I knew was unavoidable.  It hit the wires at 9:10pm.

Tom Petty Dies at 66.

Tom Petty Dead.

Tom Petty 1950-2017.

I burst into tears, and cued up “Southern Accents,” which I played five times in a row while I sobbed loudly. I already sobbed for nearly an hour when he was first reported to be brain dead. I knew what that meant. I sat in my office, nauseous. This one was going to hurt. A lot.

Highway Companion was one of my cancer albums. It’s like taking a road trip to the past while simultaneously getting up off the floor, brushing the dust off, and preparing to carry on with it all. It crystallized the trauma I had suffered, the joy and the magic I felt with Dr. Overinvolved, and the sense that maybe I was already on the shorter side of my lifeline. I was flirting with time, as one of the songs from the album says, a song that has such a joy to it that I often spun around across the linoleum floor of my kitchen during the guitar solo.  Somehow, nothing was all that different. I had crossed the street, that’s all, with my little neck scar slathered in scar lightener and sun block. It made me think, it made me look to the future with a bit of optimism, it stoked my affection for Tom and his talent for writing songs that translate to so many different life situations.

Tom is now gone. He wasn’t an immortal balladeer who would always be here. He did the thing human beings have been doing for awhile now: living then dying. And so, I cry in the car at red lights, leaving Trader Joe’s, when I see more “Tom Petty Dead” headlines, when I read about all of his plans in his last interview, at the gym, when I listen to “The Golden Rose.” I keep checking the headlines as if they will morph into “Tom Petty Alive.” They won’t. Tom Petty will now always be dead.

Most of all, I am crying for me. I am so scared of my mortality, of it all ending, of missing something.  How could death happen to such a good guy like Tom, anyway? That’s the scariest part of it all: it doesn’t matter.

Oh Tom, thank you for being one of my musical cancer co-pilots and for being so damn relatable that I felt like it was all written for me.

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